Monday, December 3, 2012

Personalization Takes Internet Marketing to a Whole New Level By Creating Easy Ways to Successfully Advertise Products


     Who really enjoys advertisements? The constant pop-up ads, commercials interrupting your online streaming, and even being showered with emails is nobody’s favorite thing about the Internet. But fortunately, with the use of technology and the rapidly growing Internet, marketing, the act of promoting and selling products, has taken on a whole new face. Now by changing old advertisement patterns on social media sites, online video sites, and mass emails, online marketing has changed from a frustrating and
                                                     vague process to a personalized and user-friendly 
                                                     interface.


Social media sites take input from individual users to produce personalized advertisements based on that information
     The way the advertisements are set up on the social networking site Facebook is new and very personalized. After you create an account, Facebook has the permission to look and see what you or your friends are writing about and that is the information they use to streamline the personalization process. A practical example would be the advertisements when I log onto my Facebook versus when my Father logs onto his. I personally love online shopping, so all my ads on the sides of Facebook are about shopping sites, boots, clothes, and other things related to online shopping. On the other hand, when my Father logs on, he sees advertisements about both auto services, like cars, and AARP, which helps out people over the age of 50. This is extremely helpful because since the advertisements are directed towards personal interests, sometimes you discover new sites or products that are truly helpful and something you might not have found on your own.
     This new marketing technique of using things people are talking about to personalizewhat to advertise on popular sites like Facebook really helped to push internet marketing in an efficient and modern direction. By having ads that are based on things you have been looing up, a person is more likely to buy something because you know they are already interested in the product.



Another way internet based social media has changed marketing is being able to opt out of ads or select which ad you would like to watch when it comes to streaming online. An example would be Hulu, the popular site that offers add-sponsored streaming of many TV shows and movies. While you are watching the media, there are a series of commercial breaks that consist of one to thee advertisements that can vary from 15 seconds each to 90-minute advertisements. Over the course of one 30-minute TV show, there are about three commercial breaks. What is unique about these commercials is that you have the ability to personalize them yourself. In the top right corner of the advertisements a small question pops up that says “Is this ad relevant to you?” and gives you the option of clicking Yes or No. And as you would assume, that is how your commercials get more personalized overtime. An easy example would be that if you click that Yes, you are interested in a commercial about cars, ads will come up that are specifically relevant to you. This personalization provides users with the ability to get the most out of your viewing experience and even enjoy commercials.
     Being bombarded by mass advertisement emails is never any fun. Now it is easier than ever to limit not only how many emails you get from a source, but also what types of emails. Typically at the bottom of emails sent out by companies like Target, American Eagle, Rite Aid, and all sorts of other companies, there is a personalization option. That leads you to their online site where typically you can change your email preferences. This is also the location where you can unsubscribe from all emails. You can select the frequency you would like to receive messages, typically very specific options like what days of the week and how many you would want to receive a day or month. Also, you can narrow down what the contents of your emails are. I get emails from Old Navy and at one point I began receiving emails that advertised clothing specifically for men and babies. I changed my preferences so now I get emails specifically about women’s clothing. Being able to limit what you want to receive on mass emails is another way internet marketing has changed for the better. A person can say they only want emails once a week and only about women’s tops. By having it that specific, mass emails are looked at much differently now.

This graph shows how internet marketing really began to take off and
get more popular than other types of marketing.
When I met up with Steven Davies (an expert in this field) at a marketing conference in DC, I asked him the most important question I could think about relating to this topic, "Will the Internet be all for marketing? Or will something else come along that reaches just as many people in just a personalized way?" His response is addressed in the video below.

video


Does this personalization really help? 

     Yes, it has shown an increase in online buyers because of the convenience and having it put right in front of their faces via Internet based social media. By being able to chose what kind of advertisements you would rather watch or what specifically you want in a mass email, buyers are more open to the idea of commercials online and marketing. 

As marketing continues to improve at a miraculous pace, maybe one day we won't ever have to worry about any advertisements annoying us!

Below I have attached a clip of a man discussing how mass emails have changed over the years.


Sunday, November 25, 2012

Mass Emails: Changing Over The Years

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Marketing becomes more personal via social media


Personalization of Internet Marketing

Social media sites look into what you are posting and reading and produce personalized ads based on that information


By having ads that are based on things you have been looing up, a person is more likely to buy something because you know they are already interested in the product. I love online shopping, so all my ads on all the sites I frequent are about shopping sites, boots, clothes, and other things related to online shopping. Being able to limit what you want to receive on mass emails is another way this is changing. A person can say they only want emails once a week and only about women’s tops. By having it that specific, mass emails are looked at much differently now. Another way internet based social media has changed marketing is being able to opt out of ads or select which ad you would like to watch when it comes to streaming online. An example would be Hulu, who likes to make their ads based on what is relevant to you. If you click that you are a mother of young children, ads will come up that are specifically relevant to you.

Does this personalization really help? 


Yes, it has shown an increase in online buyers because of the convenience and having it put right infront of their faces via internet based social media. By being able to chose what kind of ads you would rather watch or what specifically you want in a mass email, buyers are more open to the idea of commercials online and marketing. 

Sunday, November 11, 2012

How Technology Can Be Used For Class

Friday, October 26, 2012

CNN vs BBC


The Background

Over the last four days, the Syrian government along with a rebel group decided on a cease-fire in Syria due to a religious holiday. Those eerily peaceful days ended early with a car bomb attack on October 26. According to CNN, the Syrian army is responding to the attacks made by the rebels in Damascus, the capital city. The attack was set off near a local playground, killing both children and adults. BBC is more specific and reports that five were killed and over 30 were wounded. Both articles go deeper into the history of this war and how taxing it is for the Syrian people. Having to worry about where you send your kids, even if it is meant to be a safe place, is something families in Syria have to worry about on a daily basis. The rebels who set off this attack are making it clear that they do not want to participate in a ceasefire, even if it is for religious holidays.
A typical view on a Syrian street contains a lot of hostile men with weapons. 

The Comparison

CNN, an American news source, and BBC, an English news source, both reported very similar stories. The way they stressed their importance on how the bomb went off by a playground was the post prominent part of both articles. Both articles also start with a visual; both a video that looks into the rubble.
The biggest difference in the way CNN and BBC reported this story was the personal bias. The CNN article pulled on the heartstrings of readers and did not just say what happened, but it put in quotes like, “The people were mad with grief with rage.” This is different from BBC because it lets emotion into the situation, unlike BBC. In BBC’s report they just state what happened, why, and what was going to be the outcome of it. The CNN article points out whom they are blaming and whose fault they think it is. This is a personal bias by the media.
Personally, I trust the BBC one more. I believe this is because it is leaving emotion out of the situation. When I go to read the news, I want to get the information as least bias and as close to the actual story as I can. The biggest advantage to how the CNN article was set up was that it had links to other Syria-related news events that have happened recently. It is easily accessible to get more information on the topic.
It was interesting reading about the same event from two different viewpoints. The American news source, which put a lot of emotion into the article, was very different than the strictly reporting article BBC put out. Overall, I think readers should know the feel of the news source they look at to get their news and understand that some stations report differently. If someone is looking for a source that includes personal information rather than the hard facts, they should look at CNN rather than BBC. 

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Can There be a Divide Without a Gap?


Learning more about the demographics related to privacy and data management on mobile devices has really shown me that there can be a significant digital divide without that much of a digital gap. A digital divide is the clear understanding that people who do not have Internet at home are going to be less likely to have a smartphone, unlike those people who were raised with the latest technology. Less affluent people have smartphones, therefore the capability to use apps, than people with higher incomes. Typically only 32% of people with incomes less than $30,000 have phones with apps on them, as opposed to the 57% of people with incomes higher than $75,000 that use phones with app capabilities. This statistic shows the digital divide of those Americans that have the technology versus those who still do not. The divide is also apparent when you look at those who have graduated college (52% have a phone with app capabilities) and those who have not achieved a high school degree (only 36% have a phone with app capabilities). One last example of how you can see the digital divide is while looking at the numbers of stolen phones. People who are not used to having phones, the lower end of the spectrum in the divide, are more likely to have their phones stolen. In this article, it is shown that there is a much higher majority of those who got their phones stolen for being less affluent and black. Although this fits into the typical racial stereotype, it makes sense of the reason that less affluent people have a higher likelihood of their phones being stolen. They are not used to using cell phones and therefore do not know how to keep them safe all the time.
            Although I do see a digital divide, I do not see a digital gap. The digital gap is basically stating that people who were not raised with Internet are not going to be able to use smartphones as easily as others. People who are just getting a smart phone or a cell phone, the “have not” as Jenkins calls them, are still able to learn how to use the phone fairly easily. There is no difference among any race or ethnicity in their ability and decision to back up their mobile devices, both black and white stand at 41% . I would definitely say that overall with the mobile device users surveyed, there is a digital divide, but no digital gap.

What about the future?


            Over the next 3-5 years I do think that it will be more important for all families to have the accessibility to the Internet because so much of today’s technology relies on that basic understanding. I predict that most everyone will have a cell phone, and soon simple cell phones will no longer be in use. Soon there will only be smartphones and then everyone will have to get at least a basic understanding of how to use them in order to be technologically competent. Both the digital divide and the digital gap will get smaller and smaller as technology becomes not only more accessible, but a daily necessity.

Friday, September 28, 2012

Facebook


I have 925 friends on Facebook, but out of those 925, I would say that I would conceder less than 250 of them my real friends. It is actually startling to write that out because I now realize how many people I am friends with on Facebook that I am just acquaintances with offline. Looking back on my wall you see the same trend of people who are posting. It has been the same friends who are posting on my wall from 8th grade to now. I had never met someone over Facebook until this year. I met my roommate on Facebook and now we are best friends. I contacted her when I got her name from a mutual friend, so it was interesting having to contact someone who I had never met before, and just judge them over what I could see over Facebook. I also have had to send people that I did not know on Facebook messages. When I was wondering about Fordham University, I contacted my friend’s neighbor, who attended the university. I used Facebook as a space to informally interview her about the school. It was a nice common ground that we shared and were able to connect on without intruding on each other’s lives.

            I chose to look at my friend Mary (name has been changed) as an employer and I found many interesting things. The first thing I see when I pull up her page is a Cover Photo of her and many of her friends dressed in jerseys from their school and holding red solo cups. Everyone knows there is a bad connotation with red solo cups and Mary should know that it is not a good thing to be photographed with, nevertheless make it the most prominent object on her profile. The other thing wrong with this photo is that there is another girl off to the side holding her middle finger up to the camera. Even though this is not Mary, it is still a bad representation of her. The outlooks of a job are not very high for Mary thus far, and I’ve only seen one photo. As I scroll down her wall I see foul language posted by her and by others and pictures of her with alcohol in the background. I know that Mary is a freshman, therefore she is underage for drinking. So not only does she have friends representing her as a rough-around-the-edges kind of girl, but she is posting pictures of her engaging in illegal activities. Not too smart, Mary.
            Just after taking the short look at her profile, I would not hire Mary. She seems like someone who has bad friends and someone who likes to party. The interesting thing about this experiment is that I know Mary well, and I know that she is one of the nicest and hardest working people I know, she just lets her friends do things that she doesn’t think will ever effect her. And that is where she is wrong. I would be wary now days, 37% of employers look up all their employees before hiring. Read the link below to read more about that: http://thenextweb.com/socialmedia/2012/04/18/survey-37-of-your-prospective-employers-are-looking-you-up-on-facebook/